Child-Friendly Schools Documentary Series: Rising Voices


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© UNICEF/2009/Robbie Campbell

Young people today will face challenges that require them to be more creative, more adaptable and more resilient than ever before. Poverty, climate change, conflicts, natural disasters and the economic crisis call for more sustainable solutions. Education is the key to solving the problems of the global community. This series features six documentary films focusing on the personal stories of students in Bosnia and Herzegovina, Cambodia, Egypt, Ghana, Nicaragua and the Sudan and contexts in which child-friendly school policies are being implemented.

Individual segments shot in Bosnia and Herzegovina and Southern Sudan show how child-friendly schools help heal divided societies.

BOSNIA AND HERZEGOVINA: Coming Together

More than a decade after the Bosnian war ended in 1995, Džemaludin Cauševic primary school in Sarajevo, the capital of Bosnia and Herzegovina, is helping rebuild and reconcile a divided society. The school has adopted a new model of inclusive, child-centred education known as child-friendly schools. It provides a safe haven for children and looks after their health and well-being, providing free meals to those who need them and even a dentist for regular check-ups. It also actively seeks out children living in the neighbourhood who are not attending school. While some schools are still divided by ethnic origin, this one brings children of all ethnic origins together, giving them equal opportunities to learn and thrive.

Watch full-length film at ViewChange.org

Watch 2-minute advocacy video and read the full story

SOUTHERN SUDAN: Moving Forward

After decades of conflict, four years into a regional peace accord, school enrolment in Southern Sudan shot up, and children – including hundreds of thousands of girls, who were previously excluded – swarmed into overcrowded classrooms. The government’s priority in moving forward is improving quality, so that schools like Buluk A Basic School can become child-friendly schools. Mark Maluil Garang is 19 years old. When he was 11, he was separated from his family and, like thousands of other displaced boys in the Sudan, became a child soldier. Deserting from the army after three years on the run, Mark came to Juba to complete his education. He is among more than a million students who missed out on education during the war, when schools were closed, but are now making up for lost time.

Watch full-length film at VideoChange.org

Watch 2-minute advocacy video and read the full story

Learn more about child-friendly schools

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ViewChange.org launched by the US television network, Link TV, is the next generation Web site that uses the power of video to tell stories about real people and progress in global dev. The site combines powerful video stories with the latest semantic web technology, highlighting videos, articles, blogs, and actions about efforts to eliminate hunger, poverty, and disease in the developing world.





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